First Presbyterian Church of Urbana, a Member Church of the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. and More Light Presbyterians

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Sunday, February 23, 2020 - Transfiguration of the Lord

Worship – 9:30 a.m.
Childcare is available for infants through preschool age, downstairs in Rooms 4 and 5
Children & Youth Sunday School – after worship
Seminar: Faithful Citizenship – 11:00 a.m.
Christian Mysticism Discussion Group – 6:30 p.m.

“Courtroom Hearing, Civil Rights Protest, Nashville, Tennessee,” in the Vanderbilt University Archives.

In his last speech the night before he was assassinated, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said, “I’ve been to the mountaintop.” He was not referring to the mountain of Transfiguration, but Mt. Nebo, where the Torah tells us that God took Moses so that he could see the Promised Land from its summit. Like Moses, Dr. King had the feeling that he would not be allowed to enter the promised land of racial and economic justice. But that last night, he wanted those sanitation workers in Memphis, and those who were protesting in solidarity with them, to know that the promised land was within sight. The mountaintop was not the destination, but only the place from which the destination could be glimpsed. The Gospels tell us that Jesus took three of his disciples with him up a mountain where he was transfigured before them. Peter, speaking probably for all of them, wanted to build three booths, or shrines, for Jesus, Moses and Elijah. He wanted to capture the wonderful experience and make the mountaintop a destination. Who can blame him? But Jerusalem and the Cross was the destination for Jesus and his disciples. Our glimpses of “glory” are not just for us. These glimpses God grants us are given to sustain us as we work for transformation in this dark and tasteless, this unjust and unequal world. That’s what A. Phillip Randolph, Thurgood Marshall and Diane Nash were doing in Nashville in 1961. Join us on Sunday as we consider the questions Rev. Jill Duffield asks this week in her lectionary commentary for The Presbyterian Outlook. “Where is Jesus leading us, apart and away from our normal places and tasks, in order that we might see his transfigured, divine identity and listen to him?... What liminal, uncomfortable, unfamiliar territory are we being called to traverse in order to hear the voice of God, recognize the presence of the Son of Man and reorient our lives to better reflect God's instructions from the law and the prophets and the Messiah?” When we hear Jesus and respond with lives of faithfulness, that faithfulness will be evident back down the mountain where we live in the valleys of fear.

Pastor David
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Sunday, February 23, 2020 - Transfiguration of the Lord

Worship – 9:30 a.m.
Childcare is available for infants through preschool age, downstairs in Rooms 4 and 5
Children & Youth Sunday School – after worship
Seminar: Faithful Citizenship – 11:00 a.m.
Christian Mysticism Discussion Group – 6:30 p.m.

 “Courtroom Hearing, Civil Rights Protest, Nashville, Tennessee,” in the Vanderbilt University Archives.

In his last speech the night before he was assassinated, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said, “I’ve been to the mountaintop.” He was not referring to the mountain of Transfiguration, but Mt. Nebo, where the Torah tells us that God took Moses so that he could see the Promised Land from its summit. Like Moses, Dr. King had the feeling that he would not be allowed to enter the promised land of racial and economic justice. But that last night, he wanted those sanitation workers in Memphis, and those who were protesting in solidarity with them, to know that the promised land was within sight. The mountaintop was not the destination, but only the place from which the destination could be glimpsed. The Gospels tell us that Jesus took three of his disciples with him up a mountain where he was transfigured before them. Peter, speaking probably for all of them, wanted to build three booths, or shrines, for Jesus, Moses and Elijah. He wanted to capture the wonderful experience and make the mountaintop a destination. Who can blame him? But Jerusalem and the Cross was the destination for Jesus and his disciples. Our glimpses of “glory” are not just for us. These glimpses God grants us are given to sustain us as we work for transformation in this dark and tasteless, this unjust and unequal world. That’s what A. Phillip Randolph, Thurgood Marshall and Diane Nash were doing in Nashville in 1961. Join us on Sunday as we consider the questions Rev. Jill Duffield asks this week in her lectionary commentary for The Presbyterian Outlook. “Where is Jesus leading us, apart and away from our normal places and tasks, in order that we might see his transfigured, divine identity and listen to him?... What liminal, uncomfortable, unfamiliar territory are we being called to traverse in order to hear the voice of God, recognize the presence of the Son of Man and reorient our lives to better reflect Gods instructions from the law and the prophets and the Messiah?” When we hear Jesus and respond with lives of faithfulness, that faithfulness will be evident back down the mountain where we live in the valleys of fear.

Pastor David

2 days ago

First Presbyterian Church of Urbana

Today we honor Henry Highland Garnett, a Presbyterian minister whose religion fueled his work as an abolitionist. #blackhistorymonth ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

First Presbyterian Church of Urbana

Today we celebrate Barbara Jordan, an advocate for checks and balances in the U.S. government. She was the first woman and the first African American to deliver a keynote at the Democratic National Convention. #blackhistorymonth ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

First Presbyterian Church of Urbana

@auroral.autistic ... See MoreSee Less

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