First Presbyterian Church of Urbana, a Member Church of the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. and More Light Presbyterians

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18 hours ago

First Presbyterian Church of Urbana

Love is emotional, personal. But love is also what we do, what we don’t do, and what we do together. Love for life gives people energy and hope. It is the anti-dote to fear and despair. #WCC

Read the speech from Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit: "What’s love got to do with it? Climate Justice and Care for the Earth" at ow.ly/UTTd50yo8KILove is emotional, personal. But love is also what we do, what we don’t do, and what we do together. Love for life gives people energy and hope. It is the anti-dote to fear and despair. #WCC

Read the speech from Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit: "What’s love got to do with it? Climate Justice and Care for the Earth" at ow.ly/UTTd50yo8KI
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Love is emotional, personal. But love is also what we do, what we don’t do, and what we do together. Love for life gives people energy and hope. It is the anti-dote to fear and despair. #WCC

Read the speech from Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit: What’s love got to do with it? Climate Justice and Care for the Earth at http://ow.ly/UTTd50yo8KI

Church news and upcoming events! ... See MoreSee Less

Sunday, February 16, 2020 - 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Worship – 9:30 a.m.
Childcare is available for infants through preschool age, downstairs in Rooms 4 and 5
Children & Youth Sunday School – after worship
Seminar: Faithful Citizenship– 11:00 a.m.

Photo: Karl Barth as a young man

Imagine the now great theologian Karl Barth as a young man, before he became known around the world. In 1914, he was three years into serving as pastor of his first congregation in Safenwil, Switzerland. The drums for war had been beating in Europe. When the match was struck with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in June of 1914, Barth thought that his teachers and the scholars he had read and admired as a theological student would take a stand against war. He was deeply shaken as he watched nearly all take the sides of their nations and support going to war. What is more, he was horrified and disgusted to read them as they used religion, Christianity, as a defense of warmongering. He would spend the rest his life coming to terms with this betrayal, and rethinking theology in the process. Years later in 1938, in the first volume of his Church Dogmatics, he would write a section which remains powerful in its defiant “No!” to such betrayals of faith. He entitled it “Religion as Unbelief.” Join us Sunday as we hear passages from the Book of Deuteronomy and the Gospel of Matthew which put before us the great question of faith. Will we live by faith, or will we strive merely to fulfill the letter of the law? Will our relationship with God be just that, a relationship, or will it be yet another means to an end?

Pastor David
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday, February 16, 2020 - 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Worship – 9:30 a.m.
Childcare is available for infants through preschool age, downstairs in Rooms 4 and 5
Children & Youth Sunday School – after worship
Seminar: Faithful Citizenship– 11:00 a.m.

Photo: Karl Barth as a young man

Imagine the now great theologian Karl Barth as a young man, before he became known around the world. In 1914, he was three years into serving as pastor of his first congregation in Safenwil, Switzerland. The drums for war had been beating in Europe. When the match was struck with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in June of 1914, Barth thought that his teachers and the scholars he had read and admired as a theological student would take a stand against war. He was deeply shaken as he watched nearly all take the sides of their nations and support going to war. What is more, he was horrified and disgusted to read them as they used religion, Christianity, as a defense of warmongering. He would spend the rest his life coming to terms with this betrayal, and rethinking theology in the process. Years later in 1938, in the first volume of his Church Dogmatics, he would write a section which remains powerful in its defiant “No!” to such betrayals of faith. He entitled it “Religion as Unbelief.” Join us Sunday as we hear passages from the Book of Deuteronomy and the Gospel of Matthew which put before us the great question of faith. Will we live by faith, or will we strive merely to fulfill the letter of the law? Will our relationship with God be just that, a relationship, or will it be yet another means to an end?

Pastor David
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