First Presbyterian Church of Urbana, a Member Church of the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. and More Light Presbyterians
  • Sundays in Ordinary Time "Living our Faith Daily"
    Join us Sundays at 9:30
  • Bible Study Sundays
    Meeting Room B at 8:15 am
  • Spiritual Discipline of Daily Prayer
    Thursdays at 12:15 in the Chapel

Welcome

Welcome to the First Presbyterian Church of Urbana! We believe that everyone who enters these doors is God’s guest. This is a safe place, to search for and find God, to ask questions along with others who know that the life of faith is not about having all the answers, and to open doors to paths that might be familiar and some that might be entirely new. Read more …

RSS PCUSA News

  • The power of prayer walking
    July 15, 2019 The Rev. Lorenzo Small admits he had never heard of prayer walking until a pastor friend told him about it. So, he tried it. The prayer walk made such an impact on Small for being “very simple and yet very effective” that wherever the pastor goes, prayer walking goes with him.
  • The theology of barn-raising
    July 15, 2019 My mother has a fascination with cemeteries and the stories the ancient gravestones tell. I, however, am captivated by abandoned barns.
  • Top 10 things to do at #BigTent2019
    July 15, 2019 Big Tent, to be held in Baltimore Aug. 1-3, is fast approaching. No Big Tent gathering is complete without a Top 10 list identifying can’t-miss opportunities for attendees:
  • New accompaniment program at the border helps keep migrants safe
    July 15, 2019 Sitting in our comfortable homes in the U.S., it’s difficult to comprehend the importance of a ministry of accompaniment in countries where violence is commonplace.

Daily Lectionary Readings PCUSA

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This Sunday is CAN-DO Sunday: As a part of our worship offering on Sunday, we will be receiving change in the CAN-DO cans to go to our Food & More Partnership Program. ... See MoreSee Less

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Bible Study – 8:15 a.m.
Worship – 9:30 a.m.
Childcare is available for infants through preschool age, downstairs in Rooms 4 and 5 for morning and evening services
Fellowship Time – after worship

“The Good Samaritan Monument,” in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

In order to really understand scripture it helps to read certain passages as if they took place in our own local setting. The parable of the Good Samaritan communicates best when read this way. This image of the Good Samaritan Monument in North Carolina exemplifies such a reading. The victim here is a white man. His helper is a black man. When the founder of Koinonia Farm in Georgia, Clarence Jordan, prepared his translation of the New Testament, he set the scenes as if they took place in Georgia. He also translates this parable from Luke’s Gospel with the victim being a white man and his helper as a black man. Given the racial history of the United States, this reading of the parable makes the meaning Jesus intended crystal clear. Power relationships are inverted to reveal the ugliness of racism. The behavior of the priest and the Levite reveal the plumb line of justice that measures the morality of our thinking and behaving. What do we do when the morality of our societies conflicts with the morality of Jesus? Do we rationalize, or do we take the risk of contradicting our local morality and exposing its injustice? The risk comes from the punishment the defenders of local morality often impose for even the slightest violation. Join us on Sunday as we hear this powerful parable once again, and then reflect on its meaning and its call to live justly, right here and right now.

Pastor David
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Bible Study – 8:15 a.m.
Worship – 9:30 a.m.
Childcare is available for infants through preschool age, downstairs in Rooms 4 and 5 for morning and evening services
Fellowship Time – after worship

“The Good Samaritan Monument,” in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

In order to really understand scripture it helps to read certain passages as if they took place in our own local setting. The parable of the Good Samaritan communicates best when read this way. This image of the Good Samaritan Monument in North Carolina exemplifies such a reading. The victim here is a white man. His helper is a black man. When the founder of Koinonia Farm in Georgia, Clarence Jordan, prepared his translation of the New Testament, he set the scenes as if they took place in Georgia. He also translates this parable from Luke’s Gospel with the victim being a white man and his helper as a black man. Given the racial history of the United States, this reading of the parable makes the meaning Jesus intended crystal clear. Power relationships are inverted to reveal the ugliness of racism. The behavior of the priest and the Levite reveal the plumb line of justice that measures the morality of our thinking and behaving. What do we do when the morality of our societies conflicts with the morality of Jesus? Do we rationalize, or do we take the risk of contradicting our local morality and exposing its injustice? The risk comes from the punishment the defenders of local morality often impose for even the slightest violation. Join us on Sunday as we hear this powerful parable once again, and then reflect on its meaning and its call to live justly, right here and right now.

Pastor David

2 days ago

First Presbyterian Church of Urbana

In preparation for possible immigration raids this Sunday, the National Sanctuary Coalition has created a sub-group of congregations and coalitions called Sacred Resistance. The group’s purpose is not to offer long term physical sanctuary, rather, rapid response. They will be open before, during and after the raids to host partner groups for organizing legal response, information sharing, family reunification, and support. Take care.
www.sanctuarynotdeportation.org/sacredresistance.html
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